baltimore-oriole feeding at hummingbird feeder

20 Birds that Feed at Hummingbird Feeders (Photos & Info)

In this article, we’ll take a look at 20 birds that feed at hummingbird feeders. We’ll also provide photos and information about each bird for your reference.

Bullock’s Oriole 

The Bullock’s Orioles are medium-sized birds that come to feeders with their long beaks and eat up all the food. They can destroy a hummingbird’s meal in seconds! These birds are known for eating from other bird feeders, as well as taking peanuts out of dishes on porches. Bullock’s Orioles are native to Texas and New Mexico.

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Baltimore Oriole

Baltimore Oriole
Photo by Tina Nord from Pexels

Baltimore Orioles are a common sight at many hummingbird feeders in the summer. They love to eat from these tiny bird feeders, and their big beaks make it easy for them to get all the nectar they need. They will often take over the feeder, but can be deterred by adding more feeders or by making them inaccessible. 

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House Finch

House Finch
Image by GeorgeB2 from Pixabay

House finches are small, aggressive birds that can be found in North America. They like to feed on insects and nectar from flowers, but have also been known to enjoy sugar water or hummingbird feeders. Hummingbirds need a variety of food sources during the year, so it is not uncommon for them to visit a feeder when they come across one. House finches will eat anything as long as it has some kind of sugar content, and hummingbird feeders provide that.

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Purple Finch

Purple finches are often seen around hummingbird feeders. They have a unique, but not entirely understood relationship with the nectar-filled bird feeders. Some say that purple finches will sometimes drink from the sugar water of hummingbird feeders to survive when other food sources are scarce in winter months, or even make a meal of the insects trapped in the feeder.

Tufted Titmouse

Tufted Titmouse
Photo by Jack Bulmer from Pexels

Tufted titmice are the most common bird at your hummingbird feeder. There is no doubt that these tiny songbirds love their sugar water, and they will go out of their way to get it! When there is a hard freeze or prolonged cold spell, tufted titmice will come in droves for some warmth and food. These birds are small but aggressive in nature and will fight other birds for food if they feel threatened.

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Northern Mockingbird

Northern Mockingbird
Photo by Pexels User from Pexels

Hummingbird feeders attract a lot of attention, including from northern mockingbirds. These birds are quite common in the southern United States and live in proximity to hummingbird feeders. Northern mockingbirds may not be as attractive as the vibrant colors of many hummingbirds, but they do make for interesting bird watching opportunities.

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Common Grackle

Common Grackle
Photo by Andrew Patrick from Pexels

Grackles are large iridescent black, and purple-blue birds that are commonly seen at bird feeders. Feeding them is a popular pastime for people, but there is one thing you should know about grackles: they will steal food from other animals. Hummingbird feeders attract grackles because of the sweet nectar they produce. Grackles use their long beaks to drink this liquid, which can sometimes lead to injury or death if a hummingbird gets too close.

Northern Flicker

Hummingbird feeders attract Northern Flickers. Northern Flickers are common visitors to hummingbird feeders in the fall and winter months, especially during cold weather, when they need a high-energy source of food. These medium-sized woodpeckers typically stay near homes and yards where they can find plentiful sources of insects, seeds, berries, fruit and other goodies that make up their diet.

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Northern Cardinal

Northern Cardinal
Image by Jack Bulmer from Pixabay

Hummingbird feeders are often thought of as a way to attract hummingbirds, but they also draw in cardinals. Many people enjoy the beauty and song of these small birds that make their homes near water sources like creeks or ponds. Cardinals will sometimes frequent yards with flower gardens or hedges for food and shelter, but it is common for them to perch on trees around hummingbird feeders looking for a quick meal. 

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Black-capped Chickadee

Hummingbird feeders are a great way to attract black-capped chickadees.  The Black-capped Chickadee is one of the most common hummingbirds seen in North America, and they will flock to your yard if you have a hummingbird feeder. Chickadees eat insects and nectar, so it is a good idea to place some bug feeder stations near your hummingbird feeder. 

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Carolina Chickadee

Hummingbird feeders are a popular backyard bird feeder. However, these seemingly-sweet additions to the yard attract more than just hummingbirds and insects. Carolina Chickadees have been observed frequently visiting these feeding stations because they offer easy access to high-calorie food that is not available in their natural habitat. These birds eat almost constantly throughout the day and can easily gorge themselves on an excess of sugar water.

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Western Tanager

Hummingbird feeders attract Western Tanagers. Western Tanagers are colorful birds that spend the winter in Mexico and migrate to North America during the summer. They have a favorite food of nectar from flowers, which is why they like hummingbird feeders so much. The more attractive you make your hummingbird feeder, the more chances you have of attracting these beautiful little creatures! 

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Yellow-hooded Oriole

Hummingbird feeders attract a variety of birds to your yard. One such bird is the Yellow-hooded Oriole, which can be found in the Americas and West Indies. Yellow-hooded Orioles will visit hummingbird feeders for nectar because they are attracted to the sugar water. They have also been observed feeding on insects at these same feeders so it’s not only about nectar for them!

Black-and-White Warbler

Hummingbird feeders attract Black-and-white Warblers. In recent years, many birdwatchers have noticed a black and white species of warbler at their hummingbird feeders. These birds are the Black-and-white Warbler, an uncommon visitor to southern Canada and eastern United States in summer months. These birds often frequent hummingbird feeders because they can eat insects and drink nectar from the feeder at the same time.

Yellow Warbler

Yellow Warbler
Photo by USFWS on Pixnio

Hummingbird feeders attract yellow warblers. Yellow Warblers are a species of bird that visit hummingbird feeders in the fall and winter months, which is when they migrate south to warmer climates. The birds eat at these feeders because it is a reliable source of food during their migration. These feeders provide insects for the yellow warbler.

Orange-crowned Warbler

Orange-crowned Warblers are small songbirds that migrate from the south each year to breed in Northern states. These migratory birds like to visit hummingbird feeders for a quick snack of sugar water and insect protein, and they are often found hanging around these feeders with other bird species.

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Red-bellied Woodpecker
Photo by Jack Bulmer on Unsplash

Red-bellied Woodpeckers are attracted to hummingbird feeders for the sugar water, and insects that gets stuck on the feeder. They have been known to steal from hummingbirds, get aggressive with them, and even build their own nest near a feeder in order to keep an eye on it. Hummingbirds may be beautiful creatures of nature but they’re not alone at these bird feeders. 

Hairy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker
Image by Jennifer Beebe from Pixabay

Hairy Woodpeckers are usually not the first type of bird that come to mind when you think about feeders. Yet, they are among the most common visitors to hummingbird feeders. It is believed that these birds love hummingbird feeders because they have a natural desire for nectar and sugar water; their long tongues allow them to reach deep into the feeder where they find it.

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Downy Woodpecker

The Downy Woodpecker is a type of bird that can be found all over North America. They are known for their habit of chiseling holes in trees to make nests, which is why they’re often seen around homes and parks looking for a good place to call home. Downy Woodpeckers love Hummingbird feeders because the sugar water attracts other insects and bugs, which the woodpeckers eat.

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Red-headed Woodpecker

Many people are not aware that red-headed woodpeckers can be attracted to hummingbird feeders. The key is in the sugar water used for hummingbird food. Red-headed woodpeckers love sugary foods and will often flock to your feeder if you put out a little extra sugar. The other secret is positioning the feeder near trees, where they have been known to perch.

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