Blue Jay eating peanuts

Which Backyard Birds Eat Peanuts?

Watching backyard birds that love peanuts is something that almost anyone will enjoy. The little guys can get very carried away and stop to watch in awe as these gorgeous little birds that love peanuts spend their days flying through the trees, perching and swinging back and forth.

You will find that they are quite intelligent birds that can be very talkative and vocal at the same time. If you watch carefully, you will even notice them making sounds and squawking at all kinds of things.

If you have ever wondered what these little birds are up to, then there is a chance that they are just hanging around your backyard birdhouses and waiting for some fresh nuts. All of these things combined can make an interesting time for backyard bird watchers.

Brown-headed Nuthatch

Brown-headed Nuthatch
Image by Mickey Estes from Pixabay

Because they are visitors to the woods, they primarily eat spiders, pine seeds and peanuts. They also feed on the remains of insects that come down through the leaves during the fall.

Their small bodies allow them to move through the underbrush quickly and they are very efficient climbers. In the winter, these birds enjoy a high fat diet made up almost entirely of suet

Pygmy Nuthatch

Because of their small size, they need very little energy, and they can obtain this nearly all through their diet. Their diet consists mainly of plant materials, with some exceptions such as seeds, peanuts, and fruits. They also enjoy tubers, roots, and worms.

Their small and compressed body allows them to suck up as much as 18% of their meal mass each day from their own muscles. This enables them to conserve as much energy and thus can live on a restricted diet for a number of months

White-breasted Nuthatch

White-breasted Nuthatch
Image by GeorgiaLens from Pixabay

Wild White-breasted Nuthatches lives on a diet of carrion, insects, seeds, grasses, berries, and other plant-based foods. They also enjoy sunflower seeds, suet, frogs’ legs, and mice. Although they eat an eclectic diet, they are primarily an opportunistic predator and enjoy the eating of small animals and birds that are unaware of their existence.

Their small body size makes them excellent hunters and very good at hunting when they are aided by an ally. They are not, however, good at catching prey that is larger than themselves;

Red-breasted Nuthatch

Red-breasted Nuthatch
Image by Peggy Dyar from Pixabay

Red-breasted Nuthatches will eat just about anything you put in their feeders. However, they can be a bit of finicky eaters, so it’s good to prepare different foods for them based on what they enjoy.

You will find that they are easy to please and take to readily get into their birdseed, peanuts, or hulls. If you haven’t tried this wonderful bird, you should give them a try. It will be one of the best bird experiences of your life.

Northern Cardinal

Northern Cardinal
Image by Jack Bulmer from Pixabay

The Northern Cardinal is a great bird that needs plenty of attention in order to grow and develop healthily. The Northern Cardinal prefer peanuts,sunflower seeds, grains, insects, and fruits..

In the wild they eat grasses and flowers but in captivity they will eat fruits. On average, they will eat one gram of food per day. As long as you provide high quality food and a birdbath for plenty of fresh water.

European Starling

European Starling
Image by Pexels from Pixabay

Did you know that European Starlings are the only kind of bird which eats almost everything? Unlike other birds, which have very limited diets they actually eat almost everything. They eat grasses, seeds, berries, seeds, insects, worms, spiders, mollusks, suet, carrion and even peanuts.

These things are taken care of by their specially adapted mouths which help them in breaking down these foods into very small pieces. They also have very good eyesight, which helps them in locating food and in avoiding predators. They are very quick swimmers which enables them to easily catch the food which they hunt for.

Downy Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker
Image by Irene K-s from Pixabay

The Downy Woodpecker,  is a bird that can be found mainly in the southern states of the USA and Canada. It is a highly aggressive bird, which has a very large, thick beak, which it uses to scrape up any seeds or whatever food it can find.

Because the Downy Woodpecker is so focused on its diet, it is important that you make sure that you provide a varied diet to keep the bird satisfied. While the bird itself will generally eat any kind of seed or birdseed that you feed it, you should try to mix up its choice of foods occasionally with other food sources, such as peanuts.

American Crow

American Crow
Image by Jack Bulmer from Pixabay

As the crow becomes more prevalent in our backyards, they are becoming an ever-increasing problem to farmers and home cooks alike. Unlike other birds, the American Crow has a very limited food source. Unlike many other birds, however, this bird does not have its own unique style of hunting or eating.

In fact, its diet consists almost entirely of berries, seeds, peanut and insects. It will scavenge around the outside of bird feeders and garbage cans. You should also make sure that they have a good supply of fresh water all day long.

Tufted Titmouse

Tufted Titmouse
Image by Jack Bulmer from Pixabay

It is not easy to feed the tufted titmouse, and this article will describe the best way to provide a high quality food source for this species. Tufted titmice are common birds in the southeastern United States and northern Georgia and need a wide variety of foods. Their preferred diet includes worms, suet, insects, and carrion.

Unlike most other tufted titmice, these birds actually enjoy eating suet. Tufted titmice are diurnal birds and are best seen during the morning or evening after a rainfall. Feeding these birds once per day is really too low of a standard of care. If you want to feed them once per day, offer them peanuts or corn, fresh fruit, berries, and some sunflower seeds.

Oak Titmouse

Oak Titmouse
Image by GeorgeB2 from Pixabay

The oak titmouse is common to decimate grasslands across much of North America and is especially common in the southern part of the Great Plains. They are quite social and enjoy living together in pairs and flocks in fields and marshes.

In winter, they enjoy nestling in bare areas like roads cracks and under decks in abandoned homes, feeders, and decks close to water. During spring, they fledge, but in summer they return to their roosts. Mating season happens in late spring or early summer when the male begins to display for females.

Northern Flicker

The common red-winged blackbird or northern flicker is a common medium-sized bird of this woodpecker family. Northern flickers feed on a variety of foods, depending on the season. In early spring they are often seen feasting on nuts, although they will also eat other types of seeds.

In late summer and early fall they focus on suet and are also known to take carrion. In late winter they have a long feeding period, going through winter hibernation, when their activity slows considerably.

Carolina Chickadee

Carolina Chickadee
Image by anne773 from Pixabay

The Carolina Chickadee is a beautiful small-sized passerine bird in the Paridae family The Carolina Chickadee is probably one of the best candidates for frequent feeding because of the abundance of winter forage in its range. This bird feeds on seeds, which are particularly easy to find during late winter and early spring.

During the long winter months, when berries and black nuts are not readily available, the Carolina Chickadee may also eat grasshoppers, crickets, and other small insects, leaf litter, and even some carrion.These birds tend to forage heavily in northern areas where trees grow in dense shrubbery. Although the species has been known to inhabit parks in urbanized areas.

Chestnut-backed Chickadee

Chestnut-backed Chickadee
Image by Avia5 from Pixabay

The chestnut-backed Chickadee is an uncommon cinnamon colored passerine bird in the parrot family, Paridae, which is native to Western Canada  Pacific Northwest of the United States, from southern Alaska to southwestern California.If you have a tall tree in your yard chances are good you will see them frequently in and around it. They also have been known to spend many hours by the water during the summer.

These beautiful birds are not hard to find. You will notice them more in the southern states during the spring and fall. But the beauty of the chestnut-back is that they are all over the United States. Their diet consists of wasps, spiders, caterpillars, arthropods, leaf hoppers, scale insects, and aphids. To a lesser extent they also eat peanuts, seeds, berries and fruit pulp.

Black-capped Chickadee

The black-capped chickadee, otherwise known as the black-crowned chickadee, is an uncommon, small, North American songster that usually lives in mixed and deciduous forests in which to thrive. Like most songbirds, it’s an evening flyer and nocturnal hunter. Though they primarily feed on insects and larva, the chickadees are also known to eat carrion and invertebrates.

During winter, you can hang bird feeders and provide them with, shelled peanuts to attract these birds since they prefer to eat these kinds of food. You can also provide a variety of foods, such as suet and berries, which the birds find sweet and nutritious.

Mountain Chickadee

Mountain Chickadee
Image by mshorts from Pixabay

Mountain Chickadees or commonly called Mountain Chicks are small songbirds, a member of the Paridae family. The Mountain Chickadee feed mostly on berries, nuts, and seeds, although they can also eat worms, small insects and even crickets. It is an active bird but during winter they like to go beneath the snow because it helps them keep warm and in the spring they like to get out into the wild where they can forage for food.

The Mountain Chicks is generally nocturnal, migratory, and forages over many miles each day looking for water and insects. They are very social birds and live in groups of up to 10 birds.

Common Grackle

Common Grackle
Image by diapicard from Pixabay

The common grackle,  is an uncommon but beautiful member of the avian family, the crows. This active bird also loves to forage on the ground for insects, berries, seeds, fruit, bird eggs, although it is also known to eat snakes and frogs. Though they are most active in the early morning and late evening when the sun is high, common grackles will also feed during other times of the day. 

Like most birds of prey, grackles prefer open areas with lots of greenery and food. They are not aggressive and usually avoid conflict if possible. In the fall when there is an abundance of food and animals around, they are often seen hovering near fences, bird feeders, trash bins, and other sources of food and water.

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Red-bellied Woodpecker
Image by Jack Bulmer from Pixabay

Red-bellied woodpeckers are fast birds, and they have excellent hearing. They also have a keen sense of smell which they use when foraging. This makes them a good choice for bird watching, because of the many species of beetles they feed upon in the forest. By listening carefully to the sounds of the birds in the woods you will have a better chance of tracking and identifying a bird. 

They usually lay eggs in December and March and are rarely seen until the spring. When the eggs are fully developed, the young birds leave their nests to explore the open areas nearby. However, it is when they seek out food that they are most likely to come down to hunt for more food. Their diet includes nuts, suet, dead insects, carrion, and other types of small birds and eggs.

Ladder-backed Woodpecker

Ladder-backed Woodpecker
Image by 2friendsfx from Pixabay

The ladder-backed woodpecker belongs to the family of medium-sized. They are found throughout the north-eastern parts of the United States, along the Pacific coast from California to Alaska and on to southern Canada and the United States’ Eastern States. There is also a population in Mexico. These birds feed on small berries, suet, peanuts, and other insects that are found on tree branches, feeding off them as they perch and wait for the winter to open.

Their long bills, narrow wings, and short wings give them a unique appearance. The ladder-back woodpeckers is the most popular of the species; they have somewhat varied color patterns, ranging from white and gray, to red and black.

Blue Jay

Blue Jay
Image by Scottslm from Pixabay

When you are monitoring blue jays in your backyard or in parks, they usually concentrate on a single food source. They eat a variety of small insects, worms, spiders, caterpillars, berries, nuts, and seeds. A good blue jay bird feeder will give birds many types of food choices, and it is important to note that they eat a variety of foods.

For instance, during winter and early spring they will concentrate on nectar from trees and bushes, whereas in late summer and autumn they are known to consume larger foods such as suet, berries, acorns, wheat berries, and feed on any seeds left in the soil.

Stellar’s Jay

Stellar's Jay
Image by Amy Spielmaker from Pixabay

Stellar’s Jay is an uncommon yet beautiful bird that resides in the sagebrush forests and grasslands of central Mexico.  In the northern part of its range it is seen from coastal Southeast Alaska across the Coast Mountains into southern Yukon Territory. These jays will visit feeders and prefer shelled raw peanuts, cracked corn, white-striped sunflower seeds, black-oil sunflower seeds. Suet is also consumed but mostly in winter. 

They will also not feed from grapes, acorns, or any other tree or shrub berries. You should provide them with a birdbath, so that they have a source of fresh drinking water to quench their thirst.

California Scrub-Jay

California Scrub-Jay
Image by Rick Brown from Pixabay

The California scrub-jay is a unique species of scrub jays native to western North America, lying between southern British Columbia and northern Nevada in the southwestern part of the west. The scrub-jay is particularly common in coastal areas along the Pacific Ocean, though it has also been recorded from the Santa Cruz Mountains, the mountains of San Miguel, and the deserts of Riverside and San Diego.

These birds inhabit areas of mixed evergreen forests,  low scrub, preferring pinon-juniper forests, and oak woods. Scrub-jay food sources are small fish and clams, small animals, such as frogs and lizards, eggs and young birds, insects, grains, nuts, and berries. 

Canada Jay

Canada Jay
Image by ftmartens from Pixabay

The Canada Jay, also called the gray jay, is a passerine bird of the avian family Corvidae , with colorful plumage and a sweet song. It is commonly found in coastal waters of North America east of the tree line, to the tundra, and in boreal forests between the tree line and the mountain range. The Canada Jay is among the most popular of all common birds in North America.

It is a regular visitor to park aviaries and bird feeders and is a frequent visitor to backyard bird feeders. It also likes to feed in backyards and stands on trees in fields. The Canada Jay are omnivorous. Their most preferred food sources are nuts, small mammals, arthropods, rodents, and young birds.

Clark’s Nutcracker

Clark's Nutcracker
Image by Mike Goad from Pixabay

Clark’s Nutcracker, sometimes called Clark’s woodpecker or woodpeckers, is a common passerine (or passenger) bird found in the forests of central North America. It is considered to be a lower migration bird, as it winters in southern areas of the continent, and migrates south in response to milder temperatures in winter. It is frequently seen throughout Central and Western U.S., excepting Alaska and some portions of Mexico.

Its beautiful iridescent chestnut breast and throat markings make it a lovely bird for early spring bird watchers. The diet consists of insects, berries and fruits, and occasionally small mammals. The best way to attract them to your backyard feeder, is by offering them peanuts or suet.

Mourning Dove

Mourning Dove
Image by Karol Olson from Pixabay

The Mourning Dove can be found in the southern part of Mexico south to the Pacific Ocean, but are sometimes seen in northern Canada, and Alaska . Mourning doves usually nest on the ground near plants or around wooded areas. They will nest near vegetation close to the edge of cliffs, which might be where they nest from centuries ago.

The male can usually be found alone, but the female may nest in seclusion away from the male and her offspring. After building their nest, the birds take cover in the crop that is provided by the females and males. The foods that they prefer the most include all kinds of seeds (sesame seeds, poke berry seeds, canary grass, amaranth, sweet gum),  and nuts such as pine nuts, peanuts etc.