Blue Jays feeding

11 Backyard Birds That Are Blue in Color

Backyard birds that are blue in color, are a sight to behold. They are birds that are well-known for their brilliant blue colors and beautiful call, as well as the wonderful times they share with people, who are lucky enough to see these birds in their backyards. The wonderful thing about having these species in your backyard is that they all do not require much attention.

Most of them feed on insects that are around their location and will go virtually without food and water. One of the best things that you can do for any of these birds is to take care of your property. They love the fact that you are outdoors so that they can find bugs and eat bugs, but they also need food and water to survive.

You can grow your own greens, provide food and water, and attract other backyard birds by placing bird feeders near your home. These birds will come and feed as long as there are food and water to be had.

Another great thing you can do for your backyard birds is to plant bushes and shrubs and flowers and trees. These will help the birds survive. This is a win-win situation for everyone, and they will both enjoy what you give them.

Blue Jay

The blue jay has a wide range of natural habitats across the northern hemisphere, but its main destination is the southern United States. It is the fourth most common passerine birds in the United States and is favored by birders for its colorful blue plumage and, high-flying style of flapping its wings and for its omnivorous habits.

The blue jay has an unusually large population in Florida and along the Gulf Coast. The blue jay can eat almost anything, but its main specialty is worms. They are particularly fond of crickets, millipedes, beetles, and snails.

Steller’s Jay

Steller's Jay
Image by Avia5 from Pixabay

Steller’s Jay is one of two commonly seen jays that breed in captivity. It has gray upperparts including the face, throat, belly, and crest. Its gray irises have a slight blue or hazel tint. It has brownish gray flanks and its crest lacks a white area near the tip of its crest. Steller jays are similar in behavior and size to other jays, but they are smaller than their common cousins.

In addition, they have longer bills and larger wings which are used for climbing and for flapping. These traits have helped the bird has become one of our country’s most popular birds today.

California Scrub-Jay

The California scrub-jay is a unique species of scrub jays native to western North America, living in sagebrush country. Adults are rich azure blue and gray above with a darker cheek patch and a thin white line just above the eye. The food sources for the California scrub-jay include junipers, cedars, oak trees, giant redwood and juniper branches, elms, grasslands, soil worms, crickets, ants and spiders. 

During the nesting season, these birds will nest in different areas. The best spot is close to food and water as these scrub-jay birds are water feeders. However, it is possible for one brood to nest in the same spot year after year if there are enough acorns nearby. 

Florida Scrub-Jay

Florida Scrub-Jay
Image by Rick Brown from Pixabay

The Florida scrub-jay is a gorgeous blue and grayish bird, probably one the unique species of birds endemic to North America. It’s the only remaining species of bird endemic only to the state of Florida alone and one of just fifteen species endemic to the entire continental United States.

For this reason, it’s very keenly sought by ornithologists. The Florida Scrub Jays are omnivorous birds that eat a wide range of foods such as peanuts, seeds, acorns, insects, frogs, turtles, mice, lizards, and snakes. 

Bluebird

Bluebird
Image by Naturelady from Pixabay

The bluebird is a beautiful and unique species of bird which has become rare in the United States but is still seen frequently in Mexico. The bluebirds are part of a large family of medium-sized, largely tree-dwelling birds in the family Passerines. In addition to the beautiful blue color, which is characteristic of this family, bluebirds have orange and black streaks in their tail feathers and upper breast flanks.

They also possess a black throat patch. The most familiar species of this family, the common bluebird, has gray, blue, and orange plumage. Bluebirds tend to nest near, underneath, or near trees; inside birdhouses; and on cliffs and roof tops. 

Eastern Bluebird

Eastern Bluebird
Image by wileydoc from Pixabay

The Eastern Bluebird is a common little North American bird commonly found in backyards, farmlands, wooded areas, and cultivated fields. The life cycle of the eastern bluebird usually lasts from mid-December to March. It returns north during the summer, but returns south again in the fall before turning around again for another year.

The male and female are similar in appearance, with the female having a bright blue color on the breast and gray upperparts and male having a bright blue color on the head, throat, chest, and shoulder. The male’s crest has three brown wings, while the female has a single, bright blue wing.

Western Bluebird

Western Bluebird
Image by M. Maggs from Pixabay

Western Bluebird,  is a common winter visitor to bird watchers across the United States and Canada. It is rare to see, because it lives in cold mountain regions where the annual count is very low. The Western Bluebird has a light bill, narrow wings, and a  shiny blue upper body with rust-orange extending from a vest on the breast onto the upper back. The western bluebird usually mates in the late winter or early spring. When the female lays egg, she may lay anywhere from two to six eggs, depending upon weather conditions.

The incubation period is about two weeks, and the chicks will stay in the nest until the next spring. The larvae will not thrive until after the parents have eaten all the food necessary for their survival. This is usually around four weeks old. After the new year, the adults return north to the breeding location. There they lay more eggs and continue to raise the young until they are fledged.

Indigo Bunting

Indigo Bunting
Image by heronworks from Pixabay

The indigo bunting is an attractive little seed-feeding bird in the cardinalidae family. It is common throughout most of North America, except for a few coastal regions, where it becomes rarer. It’s common throughout the United States but is particularly common along the Gulf Coast, California and along the upper reaches of the eastern states. It’s also occasionally seen as far south as southern Cuba.

They generally feeds on seeds, especially nectar and waxwings. In winter and autumn it eats a variety of foods, including apples, blackberries, strawberries, nectarines, pineapples, plums, prunes, black currants and sweet peaches. This lovely bird has a vibrant cerulean blue color and has a short stout bill, a thin thick body with a dark chest and a pointed crest.

Lazuli Bunting

Lazuli Bunting
Author: Menke Dave, USFWS

The lazuli bunting is a North American songbird,  is American ornithology bird species which has been recorded since the early eighteen hundreds. With its prominent blue and silver colors, it has long been a favorite of ornithologists and collectors. It is also said that the ancient Egyptians, who had stone carvings of birds, used the Lazuli Bunting to depict the feathered species on their stone carvings.

The best time to see this bird is in the spring. When the temperature is warm, the bunting has a similar migration route as do the other members of its species. This species of bunting returns to its natal area during summer and flies back south for the winter. These birds eat mostly insects and seeds.

Blue Grosbeak

Blue Grosbeak
Image by wileydoc from Pixabay

The blue grosbeak is a small North American passerine with a distinctive short neck and black-tipped wings. It is primarily wintering in Central America, mostly in the highlands of Mexico and nesting in northern Arizona and northern California. Typically, the male is mainly blue with gray and rusty brown patterned wings, also with a red stomach. 

A relatively recent arrival in the United States from Mexico, the grosbeak grows to about 11 inches in length. Large specimens have been seen from all parts of Mexico, including the lowlands and mountainous southwestern part. 

Red-breasted Nuthatch

Red-breasted Nuthatch
Image by Jack Bulmer from Pixabay

The red-breasted nuthatch, otherwise called the bluebird, is a common bird found in North America and in parts of Central Europe. It is small and blue-and-gray in color, with a black cap, and stripe through the eye broken up by a white stripe over the eye. The Red-breasted Nuthatch has a short stout bill and broad wings.

It is a frequent visitor to gardens and lawns and is rarely seen anywhere else. Because of the similarities in flight ability and appearance, the bluebird and the red-breasted nuthatch are often confused with each other, even by ornithologists. They may also be mistakenly called bluebirds, despite having quite different characteristics and names.